ABOUT

I was born  in the few years following the end of World War II, a baby boomer. My family farmed oranges and sultana grapes, later wine grapes, and the occasional vegetable crop.

I was an avid reader, devouring any books I could get my hands on from the school library and from friends. One month, a teacher asked the class how many books we had read that month. It just happened to be month I had access to my friend Lynette’s collection. I still wonder if he believed me when I said I had read 30 books.

I also wrote – dreadful poems and half finished stories full of drama. L.M. Montgomery’s Emily books were treasured. Not as famous as her Anne of Green Gables, but Emily was an aspiring writer.

My teenage years were spent during the 60s, so I was a Beatles and Mick Jagger fan. I can even claim to have seen the Beatles perform at Festival Hall in Melbourne in 1964.

In those days (such an aging phrase) the opportunities for women were restricted. Teaching and nursing, secretarial work or shop assistant were the main options, and in some of those you had to resign when you married. Really, any paid occupation was looked on as interim until that event. I was lucky to get employment in our local public library 17 miles from the family orchard.

Over the following twenty years, I lived and worked in Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania, at various jobs, not always in libraries. It wasn’t until I was living in Western Australia that I finally made it University, as a single parent with three teenagers. With a BA degree, Post Grad Diploma and a second husband, I worked for the next 20 years as a consultant historian in the heritage sector. Researching is like detective work and has always interested me. It is not surprising, then, that I was drawn to write cozy mysteries in an historical setting.

Now I live in a retirement centre. I play croquet, garden a little, watch my favourite tennis players on TV, enjoy my family and friends, the big sky view from my unit, and write.

“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”
Marcus Tullius Cicero